What can I do?

In this blog I continue to write about the problem of the world’s largest conflicts being consistently ignored, by the media, the policymakers, the public/civil society, and academia. I was recently asked what the ‘little people’ can do to help change this situation. I guess the short answer would be that the ‘little people’ have to come together so that they can become ‘big people’.

When I talk to people about the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for instance, about how it is hands-down the deadliest conflict of our times and how the conflict is connected to minerals used in our electronic devices, people tend to react with lines like: ‘I had no idea about this problem, I’ll read and find out more’, ‘I’m going to donate to an aid organization working there’, ‘I think I should recycle my old mobile phone’, ‘I’m going to make sure I buy fair trade goods from now on’, and ‘I’ll make sure I vote for someone responsible at the next elections’.

These are all important and valuable reactions. By the same token, we are not getting to the bottom of the core problem – the power structures that keep all this disproportion in place and allow such horrible suffering to go on. To make an impact at this macro level, we need to make a message that is bigger and more visible than the separate actions of lone individuals. If I tell you as an individual about a problem, you may do something, but if I can get a newspaper to print something about a problem, then I have surely made a much bigger impact. Getting something in the news can mean getting the attention of the public at large, but also that of policymakers, aid organizations and academia.

Now getting through to the media and trying to change the shocking levels of disproportion is no easy task, but I think it is worth a try. And the media are not necessarily unresponsive. As I recently noted, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) put up on their website a special report on Africa to coincide with the World Cup being held in South Africa. The title was ‘Africa 2010: A continent’s moment on the world stage’. I wrote a comment on the page lamenting how it was such a fitting title, because ‘a moment’ was all the continent was going to get – as soon as the World Cup ended, it would back to business as usual – a continent ignored by the media. Within a few days, the subtitle ‘mysteriously’ disappeared from the website, leaving just the main title: ‘Africa 2010’. Had I made a difference and shamed the subtitle off the site?

So I begin by suggesting that people put up comments on news websites demanding more coverage on conflicts that are consistently ignored. But such work is likely to be much more effective if it is coordinated. At this point I always recall the stories of supporters of Israel and supporters of Palestine who organize large-scale ‘flak’ campaigns against news corporations that they feel have written unfair articles. An article that is critical of Israel, for example, can come out in a newspaper and the following day the journalist will find 3,000 protest emails in his/her inbox. Newspapers cannot ignore this kind of pressure, and I think those of us with other causes can learn from such movements.

It is in this light that I have recently started a campaign in Japan (through my Japanese blog) to try to get more coverage for the African continent in the news media. Japan’s largest newspaper, the Yomiuri, for example, devoted just 3 percent of its tiny international news section to African news. It is a mailing list campaign called ‘Africa is part of the world too’. I take up one major piece of news from the continent that has been unreported, write an article about it and send it out to all the members on the mailing list. Having read the article, the members are invited to follow the link to the readers’ comment section in a particular newspaper and demand coverage of the issue. It remains to be seen how successful it will be, but I intend to keep chipping away.

The internet can be an incredibly effective tool in this sense, because it is so easy to get messages to a large number of people, and because it bypasses the traditional media systems/gatekeepers.

Due to time constraints, I don’t have any plans at the moment to start up a similar campaign targeting English media, but it may be in the cards, and anyone out there reading this is most welcome to try to get something like this going. In the meantime, I can perhaps suggest taking any issue that I put up on this blog, or anywhere else you see that major conflicts are being ignored by the media, and letting the media know that you are unhappy and expect better. Most media corporations provide spaces on their websites for comments by the readers/viewers, so why not give it a try? A few strokes of the keyboard and a few clicks of the mouse are all that are required!

Here’s something else that can be done. Do something for Congo Week in October this year. It can be anything big or small (just switching off your mobile phone for an hour, for example) that contributes to raising awareness about the dire situation in the DRC. Click on the poster for more details.

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4 Responses to “What can I do?”

  1. I am in whole-hearted agremnt with you.

  2. Thanks 1markt.

  3. Thanks Virgil!

    “Most media corporations provide spaces on their websites for comments by the readers/viewers”

    Any suggestions?
    Or is that not something you want to be listing off on your blog?

    Thanks

  4. I am quite happy to be promoting avenues for media improvement here!

    Knowing that you are in the Sydney area, and considering that the Daily Telegraph and Sydney Morning Herald are pretty much lost causes, your best bet is probably The Australian newspaper.

    This paper is also pretty much a lost cause when it comes to covering Africa (with the exception of Zimbabwe), but they at least report a bit on parts of the world, and may be slightly more responsive and able to at least increase an odd article every once in a while, if they are hounded enough…

    It seems they don’t have an online section for comments, but there is an email address: letters@theaustralian.com.au
    They also have an email address for the world section, which might be better: world@theaustralian.com.au

    So, why not send them an email asking them why they have provided readers with so little coverage of the world’s deadliest conflict since World War II – the Democratic Republic of Congo. You might like to remind them that the figures show that in their newspaper 1 month worth of coverage of Israel-Palestine, or 6 weeks worth of coverage of Zimbabwe is roughly equal to 9 years worth of coverage of the DRC!

    And if the deaths of 5.4 million people from conflict-related causes doesn’t make it newsworthy, how about the fact that the DRC is a treasure trove of all kinds of minerals used in electronic devices, and that Australian companies are involved in mining them.

    Generally, they may need to be reminded that Africa is part of the world, too.

    If one hundred people sent emails like that to the Australian, you never know, they might just add an article to the mix, and that’s a start.

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